Press

“Immagino che molti di voi si lamentino della ripetitività dei dischi, del modo manicheo con cui gruppi o musicisti minori ripropongano sempre la solita minestra di artisti più conosciuti, sarà che mi son sempre sentito attratto dalle cose minori (o dovrei semplicemente dire che sono sempre stato un minor-ato?), ma questo disco attesta esattamente il contrario. E’ difficile stabilire quanto Cezary Gapik possa o potrà aggiungere ad un genere come la musica a drone, ambient ed elettronica, resta che Gapik è riuscito a sorprendermi piacevolmente fin dai primi minuti di ascolto. Tanto per mettere subito le cose in chiaro The Sum Of Disappearing Sounds non è un disco ambientale in senso classico e non fa parte del grande calderone dark ambient, il motivo per cui parlavo di elettronica si lega al fatto che il tipo di suoni usato dal polacco e lo stile si possono contestualizzare meglio in ambito elettronico invece che in quello più classicamente ambient. La musica di quest’europeo riesce ad essere viscerale senza per questo risultare cupa, morbida senza per questo risultare easy ed al tempo stesso dimostra che Gapik non è uscito fuori dall’oggi al domani, tanto che dando un’occhiata alla sua discografia sono rimasto piacevolmente sorpreso dal dal fatto che abbia già messo mano ad una pletora di materiali. I fan di etichette come la Touch dovrebbero iniziare a segnarsi il suo nome.” – Andrea Ferraris / Sodapop | October 2012

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“Cezary Gapik (also known as CEZAR) is a Polish performer of drone, abstract and experimental music, currently living and producing in Częstochowa. Affected of music creation in 1980 while being an animator of local punk rock bands, he studied the evolution of computer, was making music and right now he has released more than 30 individual works. Thus he assuredly stands among the best Eastern European intellectual musicians. Cezary also participates in such bands as QG/GQ and Sub Spa where he expands his productivity and creativeness.
“The Sum Of Disappearing Sounds” is a penetrating album which consists of 4 shivering compositions. Released as limited edition of 222 hand-numbered CD copies by Karlrecords, Germany. Associated to Drone, Noise and Experimental music styles, this album clearly stands as a model how rich and extensive integral sound can be. The substructure is balanced on the intense atmosphere which is consistently processed and reshaped by sound devices. The developing is patient to create long-lasting compositions. Resonating middle textures continuously are enhanced by various effects and oscillator modulations to create a microscopic activity in the wholeness. Static upper layers are completely manageable in a process and that proves Cezary’s maturity in music knowledge. Cezary’s unique distortion, subtle monotony and sharp sounding expressions are handled so gently just not to astonish listeners with annoying furor but to attract new audience. The pure quality of erudite profound music which ensures that noise music can be democratic.
“The Sum Of Disappearing Sounds” is like a stargazing at night with scientific talks about the astronomical theories and metaphysical scenarios that are hidden in cosmos.” – Justinas Mikulskis / Secret Thirteen | May 2012

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“Although he started as a punk activist in his native Poland in the early eighties, at a time when the country was facing the first onslaughts of the huge struggle to escape the grip of communism which would characterise the next few years, Cezary Gapik went on to widen his musical horizon greatly as he discovered Cabaret Voltaire, Throbbing Gristle and Public Image Limited, and, later, the musical experiments of Karlheinz Stockhausen, Morten Feldman or La Monte Young. His own production, for the most part self-released, has been nothing short of prolific since 1999, but his official debut release came only last year on the excellent White Box Recordings with Contrast I, the first of three instalments planned for the label. The Sum Of Disappearing Sound is quite an epic offering and is articulated around four atmospheric pieces clocking between eleven and sixteen minutes. Working from field recordings, prepared instruments and processed electronics, there is a certain post-industrial fatalism about Gapik’s work which often results in dark and abrasive sonic constructions. This is not quite the case with Uncertainty [#0522] however. If the piece remains extremely ambient and drone-based, the actual soundscapes forming its backbone are extremely sleek and polished, and ridden with miniature electronic noises and tones, sounding at times like cohorts of digital crickets and birds. Although the drone continues to develop through the whole sixteen and a half minutes of the piece, it keeps to its pastoral realm for the duration. Whilst this is actually rather peaceful, there is an underlying tension running through the whole piece which, whilst extremely discreet, still infuses a certain edginess throughout. Things instantly take a turn into much more rugged terrains on The Gradual Loss Of Elasticity [#0529], but here again, the overall tone of the piece remains fairly subdued, albeit denser and more dystopian, as Gapik keeps a free-flowing drone moving through granular components for two-thirds of the piece. In its last segment though, the track goes through a series of mutations, first becoming more distorted, then progressively closing upon itself in its dying seconds. Taking shape around a processed saturated electric guitar which is increasingly disfigured, Idiomat [#0528] continues the shift towards more distorted sonic structures started with the previous track, and here things become much more tensed. Gapik slowly adds layers of distortions through the piece, and processes them to alter the density of his assemblage accordingly. Still, No Beginning, And… Without End [#0516] goes beyond noise to reveal a much bleaker set up. Here, Gapik relies on just one long desolate drone which never really change texture or aspect through its whole course, contrasting quite drastically with the constantly shifting sounds of the three previous tracks. There is a real sense of a journey through this album, from the gentle pastoral opening piece through to the more rugged and dense middle two compositions to the arid and desolate soundscapes of the closing piece, and, despite the different aspect of these, it all feels very much as part of a considered whole, a purposely designed progression, which is a strong testament of Cezary Gapik’s great maturity as a musician and sound artist.”Bruno Lasnier / The Milk Factory | April 2012

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“Après l’Italien afarOne en février et l’IDM post-classique de son excellent Lucen aux allures de Murcof midtempo (en écoute ici), on gardait une oreille pointée vers Hambourg et son rare mais précieux label Karlrecords – notamment distributeur européen en 2008 du fabuleux Lodge, collaboration drum & bass aux effluves dub-jazz entre Fanu et Bill Laswell parue chez Ohm Resistance. Bien nous en a pris, car malgré leur parcimonie coutumière, il n’aura pas fallu un mois aux Allemands pour nous dégotter le genre de perle drone monolithique et oppressante dont rêvent les admirateurs d’Illusion Of Safety, KTL, Svarte Greiner ou des plus méconnus mais tout aussi imposants Methuselah. Cet album, The Sum Of Disappearing Sounds, on le doit au Polonais Cezary Gapik, ex punk que certains connaissent peut-être sous le pseudo de Cezar mais dont beaucoup ignorent sans doute la prolificité via Bandcamp, une demi-douzaines de sorties par an depuis 2009, la plupart autoproduites, et quatre fois plus en 12 ans que le label entier en deux fois moins d’années d’existence. Autant dire que ceux qui le découvrent avec ce disque auront du retard à rattraper, à commencer pourquoi pas par cette récente compilation d’archives des débuts, plus courtes mais tout aussi immersives avec leurs éléments plus épurés et dissociés (oscillations électroniques, programmations hypnotiques, drones fantomatiques, percussions machiniques…) ou pourquoi pas The String dont les deux longues pièces tour à tour abrasive et anxiogène offraient l’an dernier les prémices de l’abum qui nous occupe ici. Après Cabaret Voltaire ou PIL, ce sont donc les pionniers de l’avant-garde acousmatique, du minimalisme électronique et du drone (de Stockhausen à LaMonte Young en passant par Phill Niblock ou Eliane Radigue à laquelle rendait récemment hommage l’excellent Keith Fullerton Whitman) puis la découverte de la musique de Scorn qui contribuèrent à façonner la prédilection de Cezar pour les chapes de textures grouillantes, les discordances fuligineuses et autres pulsations pesantes, une inspiration dark ambient d’obédience post-industrielle et néanmoins profondément organique qu’il explore également avec son compère du collectif Sub Spa, Bartłomiej Kuźniak, au sein de QG/GQ. Voilà pour les présentations, venons-en à la bête. Il semblerait à en juger par Uncertainty qu’elle se nourrisse de glitchs, de field recordings et d’instruments préparés, méconnaissables une fois engloutis par ses puissants sucs gastriques. Mais à vrai dire, à partir du flippant The Gradual Loss Of Elasticity avec ses faux-airs de Ligeti post-apocalyptique, on entend surtout le bruit du métal qui corrode en accéléré, cette matière qui saigne sur la pochette, se tort d’une douleur sourde sur un Idiomat aussi menaçant que plombé et dont les longs cris sans timbre ne font que s’amplifier à mesure que les drones sinistres du Polonais font leur office, jusqu’à ce qu’il ne reste plus que l’os sur Still, No Beginning, And….. Without End. Et de l’os de métal, ça ressemble un peu à un synthé de John Carpenter sans la mélodie, le genre de son parfaitement approprié pour accompagner la fin de toutes choses. Appelez-ça de l’isolationnisme vorace, en référence au terme avancé par Kevin Martin du temps de God ou des premiers Techno Animal, ou du “dépressionnisme abstrait” comme Cezary Gapik aime lui-même à qualifier ses instrumentaux d’une opacité sans fond qui engluent lentement mais sûrement telles d’immenses marées noires toute forme de vie environnante. Mais si une chose est certaine, c’est que vous n’en sortirez pas avec l’envie de manifester de l’amour à votre prochain. On vous aura prévenus…”Des cendres à la cave | Avril 2012

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“Abstract Depressionism” is how Polish musician Cezary Gapik pegs his own aesthetic, which is mostly an apt description. The blessed out vapour trail of his “Uncertainty [#0522]” is a considerable detour from miserabilism, adopting much more of an angelic feel with the same stratospheric arcs of sinewy digital smear heard throughout Kompakt’s seminal Pop Ambient series. Here, snow-blindingly bright tones stream alongside tidal washes of white noise and a tumbling filigree of airborne sonic dust. The other three lengthy tracks intensify and darken the album through accretions of resonant metallic timbres slowly revolving from harmonic overtones to rasping dissonance, leading to the ominous electronic pall of “Still, No Beginning, And … Without End”.  –  Jim Haynes / THE WIRE #337 | March 2012

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“The Sum of Disappearing Sounds features a quartet of ambitious and long-form (between eleven and sixteen minutes) explorations of contrasting moods by Czestochowa, Poland-born Cezary Gapik. Ostensibly dark ambient in tone, his evocative sonic paintings also draw heavily upon the industrial and drone traditions. Though Gapik brings to his work influences extending back to Public Image Ltd., Throbbing Gristle, and Cabaret Voltaire, the instrumental pieces on the album obviously have more in common with the isolationist and industrial genres than post-punk. What most recommends the project, which Gapik produced using prepared instruments, field recordings, and computer-processed synthetic sounds, is that each of the four pieces presents a markedly different world and mood. “Uncertainty” scatters fields of fluttering micro-organisms over a dense base of lustrous washes and drones in such a way that an overall sense of calm reigns. Far more unsettling by comparison is “The Gradual Loss of Elasticity,” which unfolds at the pitch of a mid-level, industrial-machine roar and generally suggests the activity of a writhing, combustible swarm of screeching noise and buzz-saw drones. A dozen minutes of grainy machine convulsions, “Idiomat” evokes either amplified geological data recordings taken from the earth’s innermost core or alien transmissions captured by NASA and amplified for analysis. At album’s end, “Still, No Beginning, and …Without End” plunges headlong into a blurry cauldron of viral sound for fifteen suffocating minutes until one feels incapable of extricating oneself from the black hole’s deathly pull. Gapik’s vision is dramatic and disturbing, and well-served by this disquieting collection.” – Textura | March 2012

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“CEZARY GAPIK ist im Vergleich zu seinem Labelkollegen afarOne ein alter Hase. Der 1963 in Czestochowa geborene Do-It-Yourselfer in Sachen Soundart fand nach einer Postpunksozialisation seine eigene Richtung, als er die Klangwelten von Mick Harris und Dan Burke mit denen von Feldman, La Monte Young, Radigue oder Niblock verschmolz. Nach vier Dutzend Ausgaben seiner ‘Sound Sketchbooks’ im Selbstverlag zieht er mit ‘The Sum Of Disappearing Sounds’ (KR 008) eine Zwischenbilanz seines ‘ambient depressionism’. Zur Klangerzeugung dienen Laptop, Soundprozessoren, E-Gitarre und Klavier, jeweils präpariert, Vibratoren, Geigenbogen, Glas, Papier und Metal. So entstanden vier dröhnminima­listisch summende Langwellenmantras, die dabei in sich vibrieren, zirpen und beben. Vier Oms, die die Kunst des tiefen und langen Atems üben. Der Sound von ‘Uncertainty’ schwingt wie eine Glasharmonika im Ohr. Nada Brahma, alles beginnt mit einer Urschwingung. ‘The Gradual Loss Of Elasticity’ surrt wie ein Dynamo und erstarrt dabei zu einer stehenden Welle. Die Basis von Allem, der Zwang hinter Allem. Die Dynamik hier wird rauer und stürmischer, industrialer, wenn man so will. Aber beruhigt sich wieder. ‘Idiomat’ scheint in seiner brummigen Motorik dem Stand der Din­ge zu entsprechen, mit leichten Schwankungen und Fieberschüben ein undramatisch idiotisches Immersoweiter. Bassig knurrend versenkt ‘Still, No Beginning, and ….. Without End’ einen zuletzt in eine Art Beckettsche endlose Anfangslosigkeit, ein unaufhörliches Aufhören. Heißt das: Nur wenn es still würde, könnten wir endlich etwas hören? Ich bin etwas verwirrt, ich bin wohl zu bedröhnt.” – Bad Alchemy Magazin [BA 72 rbd] | Januar 2012

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“Cezary Gapik (also known as CEZAR) is a Polish performer of drone, abstract and experimental music. Affected of music creation in 1980 while being an animator of local punk rock bands, he studied the evolution of computer made music and right now he has released more than 30 individual works and assuredly stands among the Eastern European academic musicians. Cezary also participates in such bands as QG/GQ and Sub Spa where he expands his productivity and creativeness.
“Contrast I” is an LP album, released by White Box Records. Limited to 400 copies, this album had the first 100 copies on red vinyl. “Contrast I” consists of two contrasting compositions. In the first work #0473 [Tremor] power electronics intersects with drone above the glitched effects. Beginning with a static voltage noise and holding a tension for a while Cezary gradually transforms it into the sparkling ambience that covers the foundation of the whole work. It is a clever creation where the shifting sound trajectory is being accurately developed thus showing musician’s concentration into the process of music making. The second work #0458 [Drowsiness] is an eclectic experiment with ethereal sound textures. Imperceptibly evolving constant atmosphere with the fluid layers, he gives vibrancy for creation. After the emotionally balanced culmination, Cezary masterfully returns to the singularity of isolated sound. With a help of gentle resonance and esoteric inconstant, reversed melodies, the wholeness of this album injects the hallucination into listeners’ minds.
“Vanishing” is an EP, released by Entropy Records, that consists of two lethargic compositions. The first work #0476 [Vanishing] is full of abstract ambient sounds which float into higher dimensional space. After monotonic blend into prolific wholeness, sublime sounding evokes cathedral feeling. By progressively absorbing sine curves, Cezary constructs synthetic sound plenitude. Subtle disharmonized rotational surroundings prove his musical maturity. The second work #0503 [Barrier] is full of micro processing intellectual experimental creation. The whole is filled with ingenuity – from clever looped ticks to whirling keen atmospheres. Suddenly appearing cosmic effects cause cinematographic sound visions and by exploring mesmerizing sounding variations Cezary creates something magnificent. Cezary creates this skillfully shaped music with deformation of latent styles which leads to the visionary matrix of chaotic tones. He is an artist whose production needs to be explored and decoded.” – Secret Thirteen | December 2011

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“Two long tracks here, which uncompromisingly explore electronic soundscapes, albeit very different ones. Side A, ”#0473 [Tremor]”, is a strong, nearly unrelenting drone. This stark piece stretches out for over twenty minutes, and although the heavier and harsher elements fade out largely by the halfway mark, the sounds remain on the whole distressed and uncomfortable. There’s a definite predominance of clean, ‘digital’ electronic sounds – though these are often distorted and picked apart. The initial drone builds to a quite monolithic surge, with massive bass undercurrents and a thick, solid wall that threatens to erupt into noise. Despite the somewhat flat nature of the first half of ”#0473 [Tremor]”, there are carefully rationed out high-end details, which serve to unsettle by their incongruousness. The initial heaviness gradually and gracefully makes way for more airy sounds to dominate; maintaining its largeness but opening the general sense of space. Its the sound of forgotten machines buzzing and hissing. As the last five minutes approach, things take a darker turn, and the feel of the heavier drone returns in an eerier light; it’s possibly the sound of those forgotten machines being rediscovered! As a rule, I don’t often get on with the kind of ‘digital’ sounds Gapik uses here (in the context of this area of music, anyway); but he deploys them with thought, care and restraint. Throughout the track, there’s little, barely discernable tonal shifts, which spiral the ear into dread and unease; just one example of the attention to detail and construction. Side B, ”#0458 [Drowsiness]”, is very aptly titled. Woozy tones open the piece, and straight away the listener is put into a very blurry, slurred world. Its a track with plenty of detail – there are small, ascending, electronic whirrs, like tiny motors speeding up and down; as well as glitchy little crackles that sound like vinyl surface noise – but the dominant sound is of loping clouds of feedback tones; again with slight micro-tonal shifts that conspire towards murky dissonance. There’s a nice perspective to the overall sound, with elements of different sizes and placing in the stereo field. After becoming increasingly agitated – whilst remaining blurry and slurred – the track, like ”#0473 [Tremor]”, tapers in the last few minutes; paring down its building blocks and toying with them as it does so. Its a very nice piece. It very successfully suffocates the speakers – actually, it occurs to me that a very simple description of ”#0458 [Drowsiness]” would be just to say that its fifteen minutes of someone exploring a very deep seabed. There’s that sense of slowed and clouded motion.” – Musique Machine| July 2011

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“Gapik began his artistic career in 1980 as a teenage animator for local punk groups in his native Poland. Upon discovering the likes of Illusion Of Safety and La Monte Young, his work turnedtowards a power-drone agenda, with well a decade of self-released/web-published work. Marking his first publication on wax, ‘Contrast’ is a suitable title, since both sides of the vinyl showcase two opposing aesthetics. “#0473 [Tremor]” is a controlled torrent of pressurised noise that expands from a metallic rumble up to a searing blast of distorted electronics. Gapik’s noise begins to burn out, with smouldering embers and ashen grit trailing upon growling tones. Where this side matches the intensity of an early Emaciator or some of Daniel Menche’s more electronic releases, the B side is an entirely contemplative affair, as muffled tones ropple and shimmer out of nocturnal shadows into bioluminescent blooms.”  – Jim Haynes / THE WIRE #325 | March 2011

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“With just over ten years’ of limited CD-R and digital releases under his belt already, Polish sound organiser Cezary Gapik finally makes his vinyl debut with his limited edition long-player. Featuring just one track per side, ‘Contrast I’ is a substantial slab of high quality electronics with an insidious depth and meditative power. Working shades of Kevin Drumm’s monolithic minimalism just past the twenty-minute mark ‘#0473 [Tremor]’ underpins layers of subtly shifting tones with a viscous low-end throb that relentlessly burrows its way inside your frontal lobes. Changing track with the aptly titled ‘#0458 [Drowsiness]’ things settle into a ghostly drift as hazy narcotic vapours and muffled glitches simultaneously seep from the grooves, lingering long and sleepy like Oval or Aphex Twin at their most ambient and ethereal. White Box are promising further releases from Gapik later in the year and if ‘Contrast I’ is anything to go by they’ll be well worth waiting for.” – Rock-A-Rolla #30 | February/March 2011

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“The first in a planned trilogy of vinyl releases on White Box Recordings (with the other two scheduled for 2011), Contrast I is the work of experimental composer and audio terrorist Cezary Gapik. Born in Czestochowa, Poland in 1963, Gapik developed a love for punk rock and new wave (Cabaret Voltaire, Public Image Ltd.) before discovering avant-garde composers such as Karlheinz Stockhausen and La Monte Young and the works of electronic figures like Mick Harris (Lull, Scorn), Illusion of Safety, Thomas Köner, and others. In a manner befitting the album title, the release’s two sides can be heard as distillations of two of Gapik’s primary areas of musical interest, with the first side a noise-based piece and the second an isolationist-ambient setting. Though his micro-tonal drones include computer-processed sounds and field recordings, nothing identifiable in any literal sense emerges in these abstract pieces. “0473 [Tremor]” is an appropriate title for the grinding assault of rumbling convlusions that is the release’s first side. A twenty-two-minute exercise in so-called “power electronics,” the piece is a monolithic slab of aural granite whose unrelenting hum of static and noise could easily pass for construction equipment operating at full throttle. Such a description would appear to make the idea of listening to Gapik’s material a dauting prospect indeed, but,truth be told, the experience is less harrowing than one might expect. The roar stays at a fairly consistent pitch, for one thing, so that once the listener is acclimatized, the ride becomes steady and in its own way scenic, especially when slivers of metallic lava punctuate the material’s upper surface. A radical comedown following the opening side’s onslaught, side B’s “0458 [Drowsiness]” unspools at a much quieter level for fifteen minutes; obviously a diametrical contrast to the opening piece, the second one breathes calmly with washes and tones ebbing and flowing and crawling in and out of phase. Fans of Peter Rehberg, Kevin Drumm, Tim Hecker, and Thomas Köner may find Gapik’s work to be worthy of investigation.” – Textura | February 2011

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“Born in the industrial city of Czestochowa, in the south of Poland, in 1963, when the country was under communist rule, Cezary Gapik grew up to become a punk activist in the early eighties before discovering the likes of Cabaret Voltaire or PIL, then later on avant-garde composers such as Stockhausen, Morton Feldman or La Monte Young, which have since partly defined his work, which has, until now, been entirely self-released. As its title suggests, this very limited vinyl-only album, the first of three to be issued over the course of 2011 on White Box, is a contrasted affair, presenting two very distinct spaces, almost at opposite of the sonic spectrum. Bearing rather enigmatic titles, somewhere between Pantone reference codes and health assessment, the two tracks making this release hint at such different worlds that they could have been carved up by totally different artists. On the A side, #0473 [Tremor], stretching well over the twenty-minute mark, sounds like a heavily sedated Pan Sonic slowly dipped in a bath filled to the brim with sulfuric acid. It is difficult to determine the exact make up of the overwhelming sonic structure which develops slowly over the course of the piece. Distorted electric guitars or electronics, processed radio signal, decaying white noise, whatever it is that Gapik uses to build this piece is layered continuously and offer very little recess from the dense barrage of noise. Things become a tad more civilised around the half way mark, but this is only temporary, and the digital abrasive assault soon picks up intensity again, although taking on a very different aspect again. In the latter part of the track, aggression is replaced with various levels of introspection as the piece slowly dies down. By contrast, #0458 [Drowsiness], at just a nudge over fifteen minutes, is a much more polished and, dare I say, refined, construction. Here, Gapik assembles round muffled tones, moving them in the spectrum as to create a constant rippling effect which, while unsettling the surface, never actually appear to disturb the under layers. If the harsh textures of the first track proved somewhat unsettling, the smooth and gossamer feel of the second feels like an underwater dive of epic proportion. So different are these two pieces that one would be hard pushed to second guess what Cezary Gapik may unleash next. His dark abrasive soundscapes on #0473 [Tremor] are sharp and intense, yet he is equally at ease with the gentle atmospheric pulses of #0458 [Drowsiness], making this first installment an impressive release.” – The Milk Factory | January 2011

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“Über einen famosen Trilogieauftakt! “Contrast I”, das aktuelle Werk des polnischen Künstlers Cezary Gapik, veröffentlicht über das britische Label White Box Recordings, ist der vielversprechende erste Teil einer Trilogie, welche im Laufe dieses Jahres (2011) erscheint. Für lange Zeit dem Punk verankert, entdeckte Gapik die Avantgarde & kontemporäre Komponisten wie Xenakis, LaMonte Young & Stockhausen für sich, die großen und nachhaltigen Einfluss auf sein musikalisches Schaffen hatten. Nach unzähligen Veröffentlichungen auf verschiedenen Netlabels, erblickt mit “Contrast I” erstmals ein Release als Vinyl, Gesamtauflage 400 Exemplare, davon 100 in blutroter Färbung, das Licht der Welt. Wie der Albumtitel bereits vermuten lässt, erfährt der Hörer mit 2 sehr unterschiedliche Tracks Konfrontation: ”Tremor” [#0473], mit einer Länge von mehr als 20 Minuten , eröffnet das Album mit einer wahrlichen Attacke auf das Trommelfell. Metallische Noise Klänge , beinahe bis zur Unkenntlichkeit veränderte Radiosignale & kaum wahrnehmbare Stimmen bilden die Grundlage für dieses überaus intensive Stück, deren überwältigende Soundstrukturen sich während der gesamten Laufzeit ständig und nahezu unmerklich verändern, garantieren einen Hörgenuss vom Anfang bis Ende. Absolut kontrapunktisch kommt ”Drowsiness” [#0458] daher, das in eine komplett andere Atmosphäre versetztfein gesponnene schwebende Sounds, geben dieser Collage einen sehr entspannten und epischen Charakter.” – kultur[terrorismus] | Januar 2011

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“The Polish sound artist has long been acclaimed for his pensive, detailed but nonetheless visceral take on drone and power electronics, and Contrast I will appeal as much to fans of Philip Jeck, Fennesz and Tim Hecker as those of Whitehouse and Prurient. It’s comprised of two long pieces: ‘#0473 [Tremor]‘, a metallic noise assault that would give William Bennett pause for thought, and ‘#0458 [Drowsiness]‘, a more creepy, reflective and absorbingly psychedelic outing.” – FACT Mag | January 2011

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“Contrast I is the latest work from Polish experimental musician Cezary Gapik and comes via White Box Recordings, the first in a trilogy of the artists works to be released by the label… . When first experiencing a work that comprises two tracks, half of which could fairly be described as noise, one cannot help but consider the artist and their intentions, to try and gauge their sincerity. In this case though, the artists intent can be safely assured. With a long history of noise-making, Gapik has an extensive back catalogue of small run releases and CDr’s. Born 1963 in Czestochowa, Poland, Gapik was originally drawn to Punk Rock and Post-Punk while an interest in avant-garde icons such as Morton Feldman also existed alongside his more confrontational tastes. Presumably touched by the 1980′s industrial music scene, the artists bio refers to his music as ‘power electronics’, a term coined by the ever controversial William Bennett of infamous noise legends Whitehouse. Side A-0473 (Tremor) contains twenty two minutes of high frequency static and noise, intended to be heard at ear-splitting level, the piece pummels the listener unrelentingly. The track is not without direction though and is host to a few main themes which evolve as the minutes pass, the noise offset with undercurrents of shifting tone to help keep things interesting. After the white noise fury of the first side, the opening moments of Side B-0458 (Drowsiness) are an almost deafening silence and this is an effect used well by Gapik. The track is driven by gentle electronic tones which combine to give a cathartic relief to the listener and highlights a more measured dimension of the artist’s music. Contrast I seems more easily compared to the power electronics bands than artists like Tim Hecker or Fennesz and though this work perhaps never matches Whitehouse in menace, this is probably not Gapik’s aim, the artist instead focusing on providing an all-instrumental aural assault. Put simply, if you’re a fan of the kind of industrial music which brings to mind Sutcliffe Jügend rather than MTV fodder like Marilyn Manson, then Contrast I may well be worth your time.” – Fluid Radio | December 2010

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